Serving adults & children in Clay, Otter Tail & Wilkin Counties

Mobile mental health services are short-term, face to face services designed to restore a person’s functioning level to pre-crisis levels. Mobile mental health crisis response services offer opportunities to de-escalate a situation or problem and to help people develop individualized strategies for their future concerns.
Services are available almost anywhere in the community.

 

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IN A CRISIS NOW?

1.800.223.4512

24 hours a day, 7 days a week

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24/7 helpline dedicated
to helping YOU • 1.800.223.4512

Resources


Mobile Mental Health Crisis Response Program is a service provided by
Lakeland Mental Health Center Inc. in collaboration with:








  • Lake Region Hospital (Fergus Falls, MN)
    218-736-8000
    www.lrhc.org/


Frequently Asked Questions


What is the crisis “criteria” for having a crisis team dispatched to my home?

We let the caller define the crisis. The meaning of a crisis situation is defined differently from person to person. Basically, if you are struggling with a problem and you don’t know what else to do, you can call the crisis line for help on the phone or in your home. As long as there are no safety concerns a crisis team can be sent to your home to help.

What are your program hours (for mobile mental health crisis response services or “dispatch hours”)?


24 hours a day, 7 days a week

If I call during the mobile dispatch hours, do I have to have a team sent to my home?

No. You can call and get phone support too. Crisis Services is a voluntary program; we will only come to your home if you have given us permission.

How much do you charge for Mobile Crisis Services?

Nothing, crisis services are FREE.

Are you funded by a grant?

Yes, we are funded by a grant thanks to the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

Who do you serve and what counties?

We provide crisis services to children and adults who are in Clay, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties.

Can you travel outside of the C-O-W area?

No, if someone needs assistance in another county, we will help redirect that caller to the appropriate mobile crisis program.

What is a Mental Health Practitioner?

N State Statutes definition: Subd. 26. “Mental health practitioner” means a person providing services to children with emotional disturbances. A mental health practitioner must have training and experience in working with children. A mental health practitioner must be qualified in at least one of the following ways:
(1) holds a bachelor’s degree in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields from an
accredited college or university and:
(i) has at least 2,000 hours of supervised experience in the delivery of mental health services
to children with emotional disturbances; or
(ii) is fluent in the non-English language of the ethnic group to which at least 50 percent of the
practitioner’s clients belong, completes 40 hours of training in the delivery of services to children
with emotional disturbances, and receives clinical supervision from a mental health professional
at least once a week until the requirement of 2,000 hours of supervised experience is met;
(2) has at least 6,000 hours of supervised experience in the delivery of mental health services
to children with emotional disturbances;
(3) is a graduate student in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields and is formally
assigned by an accredited college or university to an agency or facility for clinical training; or
(4) holds a master’s or other graduate degree in one of the behavioral sciences or related
fields from an accredited college or university and has less than 4,000 hours post-master’s
experience in the treatment of emotional disturbance.
256B.0944, Minnesota Statutes 2007 Copyright © 2012 by the Office of Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota. 245.462, Minnesota Statutes 2012 Copyright © by the Office of Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota (Adults) Subd. 17 Mental Health Practitioner definitions when working with adults.

What is a Mental Health Professional?

Simple explanation: These are crisis staff who clinically supervises the Mental Health Practitioners.
MN State Statue definition: Subd. 27. “Mental health professional” means a person providing clinical services in the diagnosis and treatment of children’s emotional disorders. A mental health professional must have training and experience in working with children consistent with the age group to which the mental health professional is assigned. A mental health professional must be qualified in at least one of the following ways:
(1) in psychiatric nursing, the mental health professional must be a registered nurse who is
licensed under sections 148.171 to 148.285 and who is certified as a clinical specialist in child
and adolescent psychiatric or mental health nursing by a national nurse certification organization
or who has a master’s degree in nursing or one of the behavioral sciences or related fields from
an accredited college or university or its equivalent, with at least 4,000 hours of post-master’s
supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services in the treatment of mental illness;
(2) in clinical social work, the mental health professional must be a person licensed as an
independent clinical social worker under chapter 148D, or a person with a master’s degree in
social work from an accredited college or university, with at least 4,000 hours of post-master’s
supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services in the treatment of mental disorders;
(3) in psychology, the mental health professional must be an individual licensed by the
board of psychology under sections 148.88 to 148.98 who has stated to the board of psychology
competencies in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders;
(4) in psychiatry, the mental health professional must be a physician licensed under chapter
147 and certified by the American board of psychiatry and neurology or eligible for board
certification in psychiatry;
(5) in marriage and family therapy, the mental health professional must be a marriage
and family therapist licensed under sections 148B.29 to 148B.39 with at least two years of
post-master’s supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services in the treatment of mental
disorders or emotional disturbances; or
(6) in allied fields, the mental health professional must be a person with a master’s degree
from an accredited college or university in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields, with
at least 4,000 hours of post-master’s supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services
in the treatment of emotional disturbances.
256B.0944, Minnesota Statutes 2012 Copyright © by the Office of Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota. (Children) 245.462, Minnesota Statutes 2012 Copyright © by the Office of Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota (Adults) Subd. 18 Mental Health Professional definitions when working with adults

What does it mean to “dispatch” a crisis team?

A mental health professional can physically send out a team of 2 mental health practitioners into the community to provide mobile crisis services. The professional only dispatches a crisis team after safety issues have been addressed. If any safety issues are present, the team will not be dispatched, and the mental health professional will proceed to assist the caller on the phone.

What are crisis services?

1) Face-to-face, short-term intensive mental health services initiated during a mental health crisis or mental health emergency. 2) Mental health mobile crisis services must help the recipient cope with immediate stressors, identify and utilize available resources and strengths, and begin to return to the recipient’s baseline level of functioning. 3) Mental health mobile services must be provided on-site by a mobile crisis intervention team outside of an emergency room, urgent care, or an inpatient hospital setting. 256B.0944, Minnesota Statutes 2012 Copyright © 2012 by the Office of Revisor of Statutes, State of Minnesota.

How do you document your crisis calls and dispatches?

Our team uses an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) that is web-based. Crisis staff is able to access the EMR from anywhere. Some crisis staff use an Ipad as well to complete documentation.

How do service providers benefit from referring adults and families to use the crisis line?

There are several benefits:
1. Client Stabilization: Mobile crisis services can be involved in discharge planning along with being added to a client’s treatment plan as a last step.
2. Continuity of Care: We can provide seamless care when providers have their client sign release forms to exchange information (this must be faxed or sent by protected email to the Mobile Crisis Services Program Coordinator.
3. More efficient delivery of crisis services: A service provider can fax or send a protected email with the clients’ crisis plan as well. Then the client’s information can be entered into our EMR so the mental health professionals can pull up his/her information and help “walk them through” their crisis plan. Having the information in our EMR before an actual crisis occurs can save staff time and shorten the response time to the clients’ home. Provider must attach a signed release form with the crisis plan to the Mobile Crisis Services Program Coordinator.


How does a consumer benefit from utilizing the crisis line?

There are several benefits:
1. Maintain independence: A consumer can work on the ability to apply their coping skills to their crisis situation over the phone (least restrictive). If a crisis team is sent to the consumers’ home, the client can learn to apply their coping skills in their own home, which may be more comfortable. The end goal is to keep the client in their home so they don’t have to be hospitalized (this helps decrease the disruption in the consumers’ daily schedule too).
2. Building confidence and skills: If a client practices applying his/her coping skills, this will help increase his/her confidence so they can help control their mental illness; this helps build resiliency.

What are the main reasons why people call the crisis line?

Calls for adults: Anxieties, suicidal thoughts, depression, and paranoia; (these are also the main reasons for dispatches)
A. Calls for children: Aggressive & out of control behaviors, defiant behaviors, anxieties, suicidal thoughts; (these too are the main reasons for dispatches)

What happens if there are 2 dispatches at the same time in the same county?

We have a list of crisis staff who are willing to go out if called even when they aren’t on-call.

How many teams do you have to cover 3 counties?

We have 2 teams, one in Clay County, and one in Otter Tail County. Both counties help cover Wilkin County. There are always 2 mental health practitioners on-call in Clay County, and in Otter Tail County (4 total). Then one mental health professional supervises all teams over the phone. The location of the crisis and the location of where the mental health practitioners live are also applied in deciding which team to dispatch.

How long are staff on-call?

Staff are on-call from Monday through Sunday (one full week).

If I call about my child, will you come take him/her away?

NO. We are not linked with child protection. Crisis staff have no authority to place a child in custody; only police. Our goal is to keep individuals in their homes.

Can you take my child to Shelter Care?

NO, we have no authority to place children in Shelter Care. Police must be involved to place a child in Shelter Care if there are no prior arrangements made between the Case Manager and Clay County Social Services.

Does your program provide crisis services in an Emergency Department?

We began serving Lake Region Hospital ED in Fergus Falls in September 2016 and we are also in the Emergency Department at the Perham Hospital in Perham, MN.  Due to budgetary reasons and some state border technicalities we are not able to provide ED-based crisis services in other areas. Involving mobile crisis services in hospital settings is very complex (credentialing of crisis staff with the hospital) and each hospital may have very different requirements. This is certainly something we continue to have on our “radar”.

How long does a typical dispatch last?

• The average face-to-face time with a client is 2 hours
• The average time from when crisis staff get dispatched, to when they arrive at their own home is 3 hours
• The average response time for arriving at a client’s house is 30-45 minutes

How often do you dispatch crisis teams?

• We average about 8 dispatches a month.
• We average about 45 calls a month (these calls vary: some calls are basic referrals or information, some calls result in phone support, and some calls result in dispatching a crisis team).

How do you get feedback about your program?

• We conduct regular phone surveys with people we have seen.
• We also send out electronic surveys to service providers.
• Our crisis staff “debrief” with the mental health professional over the phone after a dispatch to explore what went well, and what could have been done differently.

Can you transport clients?

Sometimes. Crisis staff only transport if there are no other transportation options AND if crisis staff feel safe to transport; this doesn’t happen very often. Most often, an adult and/or a parent is able to drive.

How is staff trained?

Crisis staff complete a “New Staff Training” once they are hired. Crisis staff are then required to attend four quarterly trainings throughout the year. Training topics are based on crisis staff requests and other needs.

Will you dispatch a team to someone who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol?

Each call will be handled on an individual basis by our on-call Mental Professional.  Our Professionals will ensure quality care for the individual in crisis while maintaining the safety and security of everyone involved.

Contact Us

Serving adults & children in Clay, Otter Tail & Wilkin Counties

1.800.223.4512